Infant Sleep Guidelines Update


The American Academy of Pediatrics has released new sleep recommendations for infants less than one! Below is a summary:

• Place the baby on his or her back on a firm sleep surface such as a crib or bassinet with a tight-fitting sheet.
• Avoid use of soft bedding, including crib bumpers, blankets, pillows and soft toys. The crib should be bare.
• Share a bedroom with parents, but not the same sleeping surface, preferably until the baby turns 1 but at least for the first six months. Room-sharing decreases the risk of SIDS by as much as 50 percent.
• Avoid baby’s exposure to smoke, alcohol and illicit drugs.
• Offer a pacifier at nap time and bedtime.
• Do not use home monitors or commercial devices, including wedges or positioners, marketed to reduce the risk of SIDS.
• Infants should receive all recommended vaccinations.
• Supervised, awake tummy time is recommended daily to facilitate development.

Source:

 https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/American-Academy-of-Pediatrics-Announces-New-Safe-Sleep-Recommendations-to-Protect-Against-SIDS.aspx?nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3A+No+local+token


Flu and Cold Season


The Flu

  • Flu season starts in the fall and ends in late spring
  • Signs and symptoms of the flu include fever, chills, headache, body ache, cough, sore throat, runny nose, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Children with the flu typically appear fatigued and ill
  • Please consult with your pediatrician to see if your child needs to be seen right away

The Flu Vaccine

  • The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends influenza vaccination for all children older than 6 months
  • Live nasal vaccine is no longer recommended due to decreased protection against the flu virus and will not be administered during this flu season
  • It is recommended to get vaccinated as early as possible during the fall
  • Side effects of the flu vaccine are mild compared to the flu illness
  • Moms who are pregnant or breastfeeding should receive the influenza vaccine to protect their unborn or infant children
  • Immunizing your children is the best way to prevent influenza infection and its associated potentially life threatening complications

The Common Cold

  • Cold season is also from the fall to the spring
  • Signs and symptoms include runny nose, mild fever, sore throat, cough, decreased appetite
  • Cold symptoms are typically milder than flu symptoms
  • Spread through contact with another person with the virus

Treatment

  • Be sure your child stays hydrated with frequent small sips of fluids
  • If your child is running a fever, you can treat at home with Tylenol or Ibuprofen as recommended by your pediatrician (please note that children less than 6 months old should not receive Ibuprofen)
  • If your child is diagnosed with the flu, your pediatrician may prescribe a prescription medicine
  • Avoid over the counter cold medicines without first talking to your pediatrician

Prevention

  • Good hand washing
  • Avoid contact with people who are ill with the cold or flu
  • We can’t stress this enough, get your child vaccinated with the flu vaccine!

Please call us at Alpha Pediatrics with any further concerns or questions!

Sources:

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/AAP-Issues-Flu-Vaccine-Recommendations-for-2016-17-Season.aspx?nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3a+No+local+token

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/immunizations/Pages/Prepare-Your-Family-for-Flu-Season.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/ear-nose-throat/Pages/Rhinovirus-Infections.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/chest-lungs/Pages/The-Flu.aspx


Summer Fun, Summer Safety.


Good news! Summer is upon us! During this season of free time and relaxation, it is important to remember that our children’s safety is our top priority. Summer means swimming, prolonged sun exposure and other seasonal activities that have the potential of harming our children if we are not cautious.

The following safety tips are directly from the American Academy of Pediatrics and are provided here for your review. Please see the links at the bottom of each section for a more complete, detailed list of safety tips.

All of us here at Alpha Pediatrics wish you and your family a joyous and safe summer!

SUN SAFETY

For Babies under 6 months:
• The two main recommendations from the AAP to prevent sunburn are to:
           1) Avoid sun exposure, and
          2) Dress infants in lightweight long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and brimmed hats that shade the neck to prevent sunburn.
          Parents can apply a minimal amount of sunscreen with at least 15 SPF to small areas, such as the infant’s face and the back of the hands. If an infant gets sunburn, apply cool compresses to the affected area.

For All Other Children:
• The first, and best, line of defense against harmful ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is covering up. Stay in the shade whenever possible, and limit sun exposure during the peak intensity hours – between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
• Wear a hat with a three-inch brim or a bill facing forward, sunglasses (look for sunglasses that provide 97% -100% protection against both UVA and UVB rays), and clothing with a tight weave.
• On both sunny and cloudy days use a sunscreen with an SPF 15 or greater that protects against UVA and UVB rays.
• Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or after swimming or sweating.
• Use extra caution near water and sand (and even snow!) as they reflect UV rays and may result in sunburn more quickly.

POOL SAFETY

• Never leave children alone in or near the pool or spa, even for a moment; close supervision by a responsible adult is the best way to prevent drowning in children.
• Whenever children under age 5 are in or around water, an adult – preferably one who knows how to swim and perform CPR – should be within arm’s length.
• Install a fence at least 4 feet high around all four sides of the pool. The fence should not have openings or protrusions that a young child could use to get over, under, or through.
• Avoid inflatable swimming aids such as “floaties.” They are not a substitute for approved life vests and can give children and parents a false sense of security.
• Children over age 1 may be at a lower risk of drowning if they have had some formal swimming instruction. However, there is no evidence that swimming lessons or water survival skills courses can prevent drowning in babies younger than 1 year of age.
• The decision to enroll a child over age one in swimming lessons should be made by the parent based on the child’s developmental readiness and exposure to water, but swim programs should never be seen as “drown proofing” a child of any age.
• If a child is missing, look for him or her in the pool or spa first.
• Share safety instructions with family, friends and neighbors.

Please visit the American Academy of Pediatrics website at the following link to get a complete list of sun and pool safety tips:

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Sun-and-Water-Safety-Tips.aspx

 

BICYCLE SAFETY

• A helmet protects your child from serious injury, and should always be worn. And remember, wearing a helmet at all times helps children develop the helmet habit.
• Your child needs to wear a helmet on every bike ride, no matter how short or how close to home. Many injuries happen in driveways, on sidewalks, and on bike paths, not just on streets. Children learn best by observing you. Set the example: Whenever you ride, put on your helmet.
• When purchasing a helmet, look for a label or sticker that says the helmet meets the CPSC safety standard.
• A helmet should be worn so that it is level on the head and covers the forehead, not tipped forward or backwards. The strap should be securely fastened with about 2 fingers able to fit between chin and strap. The helmet should be snug on the head, but not overly tight. Skin should move with the helmet when moved side to side. If needed, the helmet’s sizing pads can help improve the fit.
• Do not push your child to ride a 2-wheeled bike without training wheels until he or she is ready. Consider the child’s coordination and desire to learn to ride. Stick with coaster (foot) brakes until your child is older and more experienced for hand brakes. Consider a balance bike with no pedals for young children to learn riding skills.
• Take your child with you when you shop for the bike, so that he or she can try it out. The value of a properly fitted bike far outweighs the value of surprising your child with a new one. Buy a bike that is the right size, not one your child has to “grow into.” Oversized bikes are especially dangerous.

BUG SAFETY

• Don’t use scented soaps, perfumes or hair sprays on your child.
• Avoid areas where insects nest or congregate, such as stagnant pools of water, uncovered foods and gardens where flowers are in bloom.
• Avoid dressing your child in clothing with bright colors or flowery prints.
• To remove a visible stinger from skin, gently back it out by scraping it with a credit card or your fingernail.
• Combination sunscreen/insect repellent products should be avoided because sunscreen needs to be reapplied every two hours, but the insect repellent should not be reapplied.
• Use insect repellents containing DEET when needed to prevent insect-related diseases. Ticks can transmit Lyme Disease, and mosquitoes can transmit West Nile, Chikungunya Virus and other viruses.
• The current AAP and CDC recommendation for children older than 2 months of age is to use 10% to 30% DEET. DEET should not be used on children younger than 2 months of age.
• The effectiveness is similar for 10% to 30% DEET but the duration of effect varies. Ten percent DEET provides protection for about 2 hours, and 30% protects for about 5 hours. Choose the lowest concentration that will provide the required length of coverage.
• The concentration of DEET varies significantly from product to product, so read the label of any product you purchase. Children should wash off repellents when they return indoors.
• As an alternative to DEET, picaridin has become available in the U.S. in concentrations of 5% to10%.
• When outside in the evenings or other times when there are a lot of mosquitoes present, cover up with long sleeved shirts, pants and socks to prevent bites.
Please visit the American Academy of Pediatrics website at the following link to get a complete list of summer safety tips:

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/pages/Summer-Safety-Tips.aspx

As always, for ANY EMERGENCY dial 911 immediately.

Sources:
https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/pages/Summer-Safety-Tips.aspx
https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Sun-and-Water-Safety-Tips.aspx